Writing

Piece 46 – Man & His Irrelevance to Nature By. Raimondo Graziano

Man & His Irrelevance to Nature

By. Raimondo Graziano

                Man has for much of history attempted to wrestle with the tour de force that is nature; and it has often lead to his ruin. Even when we work with nature, its brute force and strength, indifferent to humanity, unmoved by human concepts of mercy and right and wrong, its carves a path of glorious beauty all its own. It is the greatest painter, the meticulous sculptor, and the sternest of parents. It is utterly immovable by any force enacted on it other than itself. Even when we honor it, we can see that we are often ahead of ourselves. One can see it on the sea, in great ships. Or in the air, above, with our great planes and rockets. Nature is always waiting to squash even our most well-intentioned plans. There is a saying – that man plans and god laughs. For the more agnostically inclined, a more apt phrase would be – man plans, and nature sighs. 

                Man often overstates his cosmic importance – he being that his world is indeed so small compared to the expanse of the universe, must lift himself up in his idea of his own self-importance to both settle his mind, and to bring a sense of greater purpose to his otherwise, cosmically unimportant and immaterial existence. The truth is that for most of us we live lives of cosmic unimportance, though we carry on as if our deeds and actions could move the planets if we simply said so. Even for the greatest of conquerors, and the wisest of statesman their actions only transcend time here on this earth, and not across the endless ocean that is space. Perhaps if we took heed in a deeper understanding of our humble spot amongst the heavens, we would live lives of quiet duty, rather than seek to subjugate and exact our will on what we deem as lesser people.

                 Perhaps we would live in a quieter, simple world if we were all humbled by the reality of our existence.  To curb one’s ego, to quote a common subway scrawling one sees in the underground of New York City. Man speaks directly to the embodiment of the universe and is so arrogant as to expect a reply. The universe, and nature is indifferent to our existence – it does not accommodate and it does not make exceptions. It is an institution in and of itself and it cares little for us, a relatively recent blip in its expanse. We must work within its laws, and not force it to bend to ours. To do otherwise is sheer incompetence at the worst, and arrogance in its rawest form at best.

 

Old Howard Union

46 – In Support of Free, Fair, and Just Trade

Free trade holds the promise of bringing the nations of the world closer together in economic interdependence, and fosters peace among the peoples of the world. When we are one, the chance of conflict lessens – however free trade as it stands works to line the pockets of politicans, businesses and barons of industry rather than work for the workers. We need free trade to foster peace, fair trade to make the rights of workers uniform around the world, and just trade to uplift the peoples of the world from poverty.

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Show Notes

  1. https://www.mercatus.org/publication/benefits-free-trade-addressing-key-myths
  2. https://amp.economist.com/the-economist-explains/2018/03/14/why-is-free-trade-good
  3. https://www.intelligenteconomist.com/advantages-of-free-trade/
  4. https://www.fairtradefederation.org/fair-trade-free-trade/
  5. https://globein.com/blog/fair-trade-vs-free-trade/
Writing

Piece 41; Belief Without Dogma By. Raimondo Graziano

Belief Without Dogma
By. Raimondo Graziano

Can there be belief in a greater cause, a unifying theme and ideal without all the trappings of dogmatic preaching and ideological punditry? Is this stance even possible, or plausible in the modern day? Why is it that throughout much of our history these two distinctive concepts have moved throughout it all, coupled together m, joined at the hip in a destructive spiral through each one of our lived and through each major moment in our history?

Belief and dogma; together they are the basis of radicalism. Though separate them and you have to benign concepts. On the one, belief. A belief, a strong yearning within and a pull towards something greater than oneself. On the other hand, dogma, blind adherence to a cause, belief or political system.

While belief can be the bedrock foundation of our faith in not only ourselves, but of others, dogma can be the flame within which connects you viscerally to a set of values. However when one and the same, and when propagated by one or a number of charismatic leaders, the consequences have proven deadly throughout history. From Roman Emperors, to the Catholic Church, to the Hans in China, and the Mullahs in Iran and from Germany in the 1930’s to the Republican Party and base today in the United States. Belief tied with dogmatic adherence to value and customs can be downright dangerous.

However, if we seek to build a belief within ourselves, and form a bedrock of foundational principles we can see that these are not one concept together, but two distinctive ones and we can leverage both to build a better world. Through the individual, we can see past the lies that the elites and supposed intellectuals of the world push on us subconsciously. Through an educated populace we all together can break the wheel so to speak, for good. 

Writing

Piece 41 -The Preservation of Our Collective Wilds By. Raimondo Graziano

The Preservation of Our Collective Wilds
By. Raimondo Graziano

There is much talk domestically about the effects that man has had over the last two hundred years, due to industrialization, on our wilds, our rivers, our oceans and seas and in regards to the air we breathe and the water we drink. There is clear consensus that man has in some way or another adversely affected this place we call our home. That man has been derelict in his stewardship over this land of ours. That man has exploited the wilds, and precious resources of this our only home, for the benefit of profit, and an allegiance to the idea of perpetual growth. Two very misguided reasons, excuses really, for the degradation of our world and the ruining of such for our children and grandchildren to come. Our advances and strides have been great, and have afforded a standard of living onto the people of world unknown before in the history of humanity. Even to the poorest of the worlds poor. But, at what cost?


The world after the dawn of the industrial age was indeed a world of great promise, but it most be sternly noted, that it was a world of capitalism run rampant and exploitation on a grand scale, a gilded age in which the barons of industry dug their claws further into government and the relationship between business and governance grew ever closer, and the rights of workers not yet enumerated where trampled upon. The beginning of deforestation of our great wilds, acidification of our oceans, lakes and streams and poisoning of our water supplies, and the exponential consumption of resources and the boom in the number of peoples in this world was simply the surface of the greed to come.


In progress, we often skirt the long term aims and safeguards, for short term gains of wealth and appeasement of an ever hungry mass. In other words, we forget and neglect our role as stewards – the role of ensuring the sanctity of our home for profit. In this a lesson can be learned, that we need not forsake progress to preserve our world – rather a balance must be stuck. Greed, excess, and the ills of capitalism cannot be allowed to run amok. Industry serves it’s own ends, and only from vocal public pressure can we ensure that industry, and the politicians they fund remain accountable. We must act now, or forsake the great project that is humanity due to perhaps our greatest inherent flaw – blind belief in our right to exist, independent of our care for this world.

Old Howard Union

38 – How I Became Interested In Politics, and Lessons Learned

Tonight a slight digression from the usual talk of politics, social movements and the like to address a question posed by a listener – how is it that I became interested in politics. It’s a long journey. With many diversions, but always a singular unifying theme – service to a higher cause.

Show Notes

No show notes this evening.